My East Africa, Madagascar & other wildlife photos

www.flickr.com More of my East Africa photos
www.flickr.com More of my Madagascar photos
www.flickr.com More of my other wildlife spotting photos

Thursday, June 30, 2011

iNaturalist.org · Eurasian Spoonbill, observed by Schaapmans at 04:00 PM CET on February 20, 2011

iNaturalist.org · Eurasian Spoonbill, observed by Schaapmans at 04:00 PM CET on February 20, 2011: "This afternoon in the meadows near Leiden in The Netherlands I saw a Eursian Spoonbill. I'm used to seeing birds from the stork and heron families. I've seen Spoonbills in Africa, but this was the first time I saw a Spoonbill in The Netherlands :-)

Blogged about it: Eurasian Spoonbill in The Netherlands"

iNaturalist.org · European Mole, observed by Schaapmans at 10:06 PM CEST on June 15, 2011

iNaturalist.org · European Mole, observed by Schaapmans at 10:06 PM CEST on June 15, 2011: "15 June 2011 - Utrecht, The Netherlands
European mole (Europese mol; Talpa europaea) found dead in a parking lot in the suburbs of Utrecht in The Netherlands. There is shrub and a park in the vicinity."

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

iNaturalist.org · Golden Mantella, observed by Schaapmans at 03:04 PM CEST on July 26, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Golden Mantella, observed by Schaapmans at 03:04 PM CEST on July 26, 2008: "Golden Mantella / Gouden kikker (Mantella aurantiaca) - Exotic Reserve Peyrieras, Madagascar

Note: Captive specimen. Can't be used for wild distribution surveys."

iNaturalist.org · Cane Toad, observed by Schaapmans at 09:59 PM CEST on April 9, 2007

iNaturalist.org · Cane Toad, observed by Schaapmans at 09:59 PM CEST on April 9, 2007: "9 april 2007, Rio Dulce, Guatemala
Cane Toad (Rhinella marina, formerly known as Bufo marinus).

At night in the moist grass of an island in the lake near Rio Dulce. The grass was full of huge spiders, insects and of course this cane toad."

iNaturalist.org · Svynnerton's bush squirrel, observed by Schaapmans at 02:00 PM CET on October 31, 2009

iNaturalist.org · Svynnerton's bush squirrel, observed by Schaapmans at 02:00 PM CET on October 31, 2009: "31 October 2009 - Mazumbai Forest, East Usambara Mountains, Tanzania

Swynnerton's Bush Squirrel, Svynnerton's Bush Squirrel or Lushoto Mountain Squirrel / Swynnertons Boseekhoorn (Paraxerus vexillarius)

It's not the best photo, but it's probably one of the few photos out there of this species.

Circumstances:
Mazumbai Forest in the East Usambara Mountains in Tanzania. A still pristine montane tropical rainforest. This is the thick undergrowth of the secundairy rainforest."

iNaturalist.org · Flatid Planthoppers, observed by Schaapmans at 04:21 PM CEST on August 7, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Flatid Planthoppers, observed by Schaapmans at 04:21 PM CEST on August 7, 2008: "7 August 2008 - Spiny Forest, Renalia Project, Ifaty, Madagascar.

Nymphs of the Madagascan Flatid Leaf-bug (Phromnia rosea).

These nymphs excrete a sort of white waxy substance which 'grows' from the animal like long wipsy feathers. If a bird of other predator makes a grab for one of these insects it gets a beakful of white nothing, and the animal hops away."

iNaturalist.org · blue wildebeest, observed by Schaapmans at 10:59 AM CEST on October 16, 2009

iNaturalist.org · blue wildebeest, observed by Schaapmans at 10:59 AM CEST on October 16, 2009: "16 October 2009 - Mikumi National Park, Tanzania

Injured Common Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), subspecies Nyassaland Wildebeest or Johnston's Wildebeest or Nyassa Gnu (Connochaetes taurinus johnstoni)"

iNaturalist.org · Zanj sun squirrel, observed by Schaapmans at 06:58 AM CEST on October 20, 2009

iNaturalist.org · Zanj sun squirrel, observed by Schaapmans at 06:58 AM CEST on October 20, 2009: "20 October 2009 - Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania

Zanj Sun Squirrel or Eastern Sun Squirrel/ Zanj Zonne-eekhoorn (Heliosciurus undulatus)

Identity of this Sun Squirrel not certain. I doubt between Zanj Sun Squirrel (Heliosciurus undulatus) and Mutable Sun Squirrel (Heliosciurus mutabilis). The early morning sun and white balance settings make it hard to ID based on fur colour. However the tail seems to be longer than the body, implying it can be the Zanj Sun Squirrel.

Please leave a comment if you can identify or have good reference sources.

Circumstances:
Early morning (7AM), Selous River Camp. A few 100m from Rufiji River. Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania. Highly active squirrel."

iNaturalist.org · Blue Monkey, observed by Schaapmans at 05:28 PM CEST on October 19, 2009

iNaturalist.org · Blue Monkey, observed by Schaapman at 05:28 PM CEST on October 19, 2009: "19 October 2009 - Rufiji River, Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania

Blue Monkey or Diademed Monkey / Diadeemmeerkat (Cercopithecus mitis)"

iNaturalist.org · topi, observed by Schaapmans at 10:52 AM CEST on September 20, 2009

iNaturalist.org · topi, observed by Schaapmans at 10:52 AM CEST on September 20, 2009: "20 September 2009 - Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

Topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela)

Species: Topi and Korrigum / Lierantilope of Basterdhartenbeest (Damaliscus lunatus)
Subspecies: Topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela)"

iNaturalist.org · topi, observed by Schaapmans at 07:14 AM CEST on September 4, 2009

iNaturalist.org · topi, observed by Schaapmans at 07:14 AM CEST on September 4, 2009: "4 September 2009 - Maasai Mara National Park, Kenya

Topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela)

Species: Topi and Korrigum / Lierantilope of Basterdhartenbeest (Damaliscus lunatus)
Subspecies: Topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela)"

iNaturalist.org · Gmelin's Woolly Lemur, observed by Schaapmans at 09:07 AM CEST on July 27, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Gmelin's Woolly Lemur, observed by Schaapmans at 09:07 AM CEST on July 27, 2008: "27 July 2008 - Analamazaotra National Park (Périnet), Madagascar

Eastern Avahi or Eastern Woolly Lemur / Oostelijke Avahi of Oostelijke Wolmaki (Avahi laniger)."

iNaturalist.org · Giant leaf-tail gecko, observed by Schaapmans at 02:49 PM CEST on July 26, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Giant leaf-tail gecko, observed by Schaapmans at 02:49 PM CEST on July 26, 2008: "26 July 2008
Giant leaf-tail gecko / reuzenbladstaartgekko (Uroplatus fimbriatus)

Captive specimen. Can't be used for valid wildlife distribution!

For those who like the biological details:
Click a link and you'll go to the Flickr photo page for that rank in the biological classification."

iNaturalist.org · L’hoest’s Monkey, observed by Schaapmans at 05:42 PM CEST on September 15, 2009

iNaturalist.org · L’hoest’s Monkey, observed by Schaapmansat 05:42 PM CEST on September 15, 2009: "15 September 2009 - Bigodi Wetland Sanctuary, next to Kibale National Park, Uganda

L'Hoest's Monkey or Mountain Monkey / L'Hoëstmeerkat of Bergmeerkat (Cercopithecus lhoesti)."

Story with more backgrounds and some coincidences: "L'Hoest mogelijk!"

iNaturalist.org · Tail-less Tenrec, observed by Schaapmans at 12:08 PM CEST on July 26, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Tail-less Tenrec, observed by Schaapmans at 12:08 PM CEST on July 26, 2008: "26 July 2008.
Common tenrec / gewone tenrek (Tenrec ecaudatus) in Exotic Reserve Peyrieras, Madagascar.
Captive tenrecs."

See also the complete story behind the tenrecs: http://wildlifespotting.blogspot.com/2010/08/madagascar-day-2-tenrecs-are-weird.html

iNaturalist.org · Blue Monkey, observed by Schaapmans at 11:26 AM CEST on October 5, 2009

iNaturalist.org · Blue Monkey, observed by Schaapmans at 11:26 AM CEST on October 5, 2009: "5 October 2009 - Jozani Forest (Jozani-Chwaka Bay National Park), Zanzibar, Tanzania.

Sykes' Monkey or White-throated Monkey / Witkeelmeerkat (Cercopithecus albogularis), subspecies: Zanzibar Sykes' Monkey / Zanzibar Witkeelmeerkat (Cercopithecus albogularis albogularis).

Subspecies Zanzibar Sykes' Monkey is also known as Cercopithecus mitis albogularis.

There is some dispute about the classification: is this Blue Monkey from Zanzibar a species (if so, what species, C. mitis or C. albogularis?) or a subspecies (C. m. albogularis or C. a. albogularis?). If anybody has an conclusive answer, please leave a comment."

iNaturalist.org · Rufous Mouse Lemur, observed by Schaapmans at 05:47 PM CEST on August 1, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Rufous Mouse Lemur, observed by Schaapmans at 05:47 PM CEST on August 1, 2008: "1 August 2008.
Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar.

During a nightwalk I encountered this lemur.

It had to be lit with torch light to not blind it."

iNaturalist.org · European Black-tailed Godwit, observed by Schaapmans at 06:33 PM CEST on April 24, 2011

iNaturalist.org · European Black-tailed Godwit, observed by Schaapmans at 06:33 PM CEST on April 24, 2011: "24 April 2011 - Meadows near Leiden, South Holland, The Netherlands

Black-tailed Godwit / Grutto (Limosa limosa),
subspecies: European Black-tailed Godwit / Grutto ( Limosa limosa limosa.

In spring around 90% of European Black-tailed Godwits in North-western Europa are nesting in The Netherlands. In the 1990's there was a decline of 50% in the Black-tailed Godwit populations. Luckily some meadows are now protected areas in the brooding season. IUCN's Red List for endangered species now lists this species as Near Threatened.

Read the blog about this bird: http://wildlifespotting.blogspot.com/2011/04/black-tailed-godwit-in-netherlands.html"

iNaturalist.org · Pelophylax, observed by Schaapmans on April 17, 2011

iNaturalist.org · Pelophylax, observed by Schaapmans on April 17, 2011: "Green frog in the Pelophylaxv genus. Three possible species (ID please!):
P. ridibundus - Marsh Frog (NL: Meerkikker),
P. lessonae - Pool Frog (NL: Poelkikker),
P. kl. esculentus (hybrid of the other two) - Edible Frog (NL: Bastaardkikker).

It was hopping around on the road just outside town at 21:30 and sat still as we approached with the dogs. Was happy to have his photo taken with my phone."

iNaturalist.org · Tomato Frog, observed by Schaapmans on July 26, 2008

iNaturalist.org · Tomato Frog, observed by Schaapmans on July 26, 2008

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Frog Spotting: Global Amphibian Blitz

iNaturalist just contacted me to contribute my photo of the Tomato frog in Madagascar.

I'm into wildlife spotting. That's what this blog is all about. Making a contribution to science and this project is something I like to do as well. Already participate in ARKive and Encyclopedia of Life. So a good addition. I actually already was looking into a way of logging my 'spottings'. Like to have an app on my phone for that :-)iNaturalist and their project Global Amphibian Blitz are a good starting point!

With iNaturalist you can log any sightings of an animal - from myriapods to amphibians - you've made. This contributes to the understanding of range (and decline in habitat) of the animals you encounter. Valuable information. The IUCN and Smithsonian launched a project called Global Amphibian Blitz. Amphibians around the world are rapidly disappearing. To conserve these fascinating creatures, scientists need everybody's help! By contributing photographs (locations of rare species are obscured) of amphibians along with the dates and locations where you observed them from anywhere in the world. Through the cooperation of scientists and amateur naturalists - like me - from around the globe, we can census the world’s amphibians and find out who’s still here and where do they persist.

If you like to participate too and add your spotted amphibians to the list, please do so! Also your local toad or the tree frog on holidays is valuable. If you don't know the species, they can help determine it for you. There are easy logins through Facebook, Google and Yahoo! so you don't need to create all new accounts and passwords. You can share photos via Flickr and Picasa, though I did not manage to get my Flickr link working yet.

If you want to know how you can make a contribution, watch the video.

Monday, June 27, 2011

Tetrapod Zoology: an introduction to hornbills

Hornbills are among the most distinct and typical looking birds. Often flamboyant in colours with a big crest on their bill.

In East-Africa I spotted several species of hornbill, including the Southern Ground-Hornbill mentioned in the linked blog and the Von der Decken's Hornbill. Tetrapod Zoology is one of my favourite blogs and now has an interesting article about hornbills.
An introduction to hornbills.
And the follow up blog of Tetrapod Zoology:
What does it feel like to get bitten by a ground hornbill, I hear you ask?.